Media Technology News - TV Channel Online: A pill to stop aging? I want one!

Media Technology News - TV Channel Online: A pill to stop aging? I want one!: The drug is called rapamycin . After nearly a decade of research showing that it makes mice live up to 60% longer, scientists are trying it ...

A pill to stop aging? I want one!

The drug is called rapamycin. After nearly a decade of research showing that it makes mice live up to 60% longer, scientists are trying it out as an anti-aging drug in dogs and humans. Read more

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Media Technology News - TV Channel Online: Dogs do really know what you're saying!

Media Technology News - TV Channel Online: Dogs do really know what you're saying!  Home

OH NO! Zika Mosquitoes Can Infect Their Eggs, Too

Zika Mosquitoes Can Infect Their Eggs, Too

NBCNews.com‎ - 3 hours ago
The Aedes mosquitoes that spread Zika can leave little Zika bombs in their eggs, helping the virus survive dry spells. Here's another reason it will be hard to get rid of Zika: Mosquitoes can pass the virus to their offspring in their eggs. It's not a surprising finding. Mosquitoes infect their larvae with other viruses, too, including Zika's close relative the dengue virus.

But it's another obstacle for people trying to get rid of Zika and the mosquitoes that spread it. In this May 23, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito sits inside a glass tube at the Fiocruz institute where they have been screening for mosquitos naturally infected with the Zika virus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. "It makes control harder," said Dr. Robert Tesh of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. "Spraying affects adults, but it does not usually kill the immature forms — the eggs and larvae. Spraying will reduce transmission, but it may not eliminate the virus."

Usually, it takes people plus mosquitoes to spread a virus. The mosquitoes bite actively infected people, incubate the virus for a while, and then bite other people to spread it. If no people in an area are infected, no virus spreads. Sometimes an animal can act as a reservoir — birds can keep West Nile Virus spreading, for instance. Related: Two Existing Drugs Might Stop Zika. So-called vertical transmission allows the virus to spread even if all the adult mosquitoes in an area die out. Tesh and colleagues infected Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus mosquitoes with Zika and then tested the eggs they laid. Read on

Now there is concern about the pesticide being harmful to people.

Will keep you posted when I find more research on this topic.

Dogs do really know what you're saying!

How smart is your dog? Wolf or Dog it does not matter. How long have they understood our language no matter what country your languages is? Are we giving them enough credit for how smart they really are?

Good dog! Your dog knows what you’re saying, study suggests. They love words you say to them such as: My baby, did you go bye bye, where you been, good girl, good boy, give me kisses, give me loving, good doggie, and etc. Scientists have found evidence to support what many dog owners have long believed: man’s best friend really does understand some of what we’re saying. They found that dogs processed words with the left hemisphere, while intonation was processed with the right hemisphere — just like humans.

What’s more, the dogs only registered that they were being praised if the words and intonation were positive; meaningless words spoken in an encouraging voice, or meaningful words in a neutral tone, didn’t have the same effect.

“Dog brains care about both what we say and how we say it,” said lead researcher Attila Andics, a neuroscientist at Eotvos Lorand University in Budapest. “Praise can work as a reward only if both word meaning and intonation match.” Read more...